The role of nonstandard work hours in maternal caregiving for young children

by Rachel Connelly

Publisher: IZA in Bonn, Germany

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 51
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Subjects:

  • Working mothers.,
  • Child care.,
  • Flextime.

Edition Notes

Statementby Rachel Connelly, Jean Kimmel.
SeriesDiscussion paper -- no. 3093, Discussion paper (Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit : Online) -- no. 3093
ContributionsKimmel, Jean.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD5701
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22695614M
LC Control Number2007619701

service-industry jobs, nonstandard work hours become the norm. Alterations in work schedules occur most frequently in low-wage jobs, but many higher-wage sales and technical positions also involve nonstandard work hours. These changes have a pro-found impact on the fabric of home life and particularly childcare (Presser, ). The caregiver may experience increased depression and WFC, and lower well-being. Ultimately, their performance for work and family roles may suffer. For example, primary caregivers for an aging parent are more likely to take unpaid leaves from work, reduce their work hours, and rearrange their work schedules (Kossek et al., ). In addition. Full Transcript. Talking to kids about politics and the election. Intro: Welcome to the Equal Parts podcast, brought to you by [email protected] Emily Paisner: Being a working parent is hard, and in , working moms, in particular, are struggling. They have kids at home, careers to maintain, and households to run, and they're pulling back on their careers or dropping out of the workforce entirely. This report looks into the early learning and development of young children in England, Estonia, and the United States. It presents data from the International Early Learning and Child Well-Being Study, which was designed to help countries assess their children's skills and development and to understand how these relate to children's early learning experiences and well-being.

Maternal and child health nurses work in partnership with families to care for babies and young children until they start school. The service is free for all Victorian families. You will visit a maternal and child health nurse at 10 key ages and stages from birth to three and a half years. However, having young children can often bring up different emotions and relationship challenges for parents and caregivers. One in six mothers and one in 10 fathers experience postnatal depression, and one in five women experience postnatal anxiety in the first year after the birth of their baby. For example, most mothers prefer the father to be the child care provider if the mother cannot provide the care. 5 Additionally, married men are likely to be the primary caregivers of their children during the mother’s working hours if the family is poor, if the father is unemployed or working part-time, or if the children are younger. 6. Introduction. Maternal sensitivity (MS) is the appropriate and prompt response of the mother to the infant (1).Mothers have not only to be aware and interpret her infant’s signals in a proper way but also to respond in an adequate manner (2).MS is essential for the development of attachment security (1).Mothers have different levels of sensitivity towards their infant’s signals, going.

Other work examined how the working conditions of single mothers who enter low-wage employment influence childrens emotional development. The results show that children can fare worse when mothers have a long commute, while other factors, such as working nonstandard shifts or working irregular hours, did not influence children. 1. Explore the impact of maternal work stress on mother and child behavior and physiology. To this end, I designed and implimented a study of working mothers and their young children. I specifically focused on morning routines and stress on work and non-work. Roughly 60 . Kalil, Ariel, Rachel Dunifon, Danielle Crosby and Jessica Su (). “Work Hours, Work Schedules and Sleep Duration Among Mothers and their Young Children”. Journal of Marriage and Family, 76(5): Healy, Olivia and Rachel Dunifon (). “Child Care Subsidies and Family Well-Being”. Social Service Review, 88(3): Drawing on several decades of work with families, pediatricians, other health care professionals, and policy makers, the American Academy of Pediatrics provides a definition of patient- and family-centered care. In pediatrics, patient- and family-centered care is based on the understanding that the family is the child’s primary source of strength and support.

The role of nonstandard work hours in maternal caregiving for young children by Rachel Connelly Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children The large influx of women into the paid workforce observed in the past century and the resulting work/family conundrum has been much discussed in the academic community and popular media.

Since the timing of employment is, in part, a choice made by mothers, which is sometimes explicitly related to caregiving concerns, we argue that the decision to work nonstandard hours must be. IZA DP No. The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children Rachel Connelly, Jean Kimmel published as 'The Role of Non-standard Work Status in Parental Caregiving for Young Children ' in Eastern Economic Journal,37 (2),   The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children.

IZA Discussion Paper No. Especially important is the additional hours of evening care given by those with a young school-aged child if the mother works standard hours only, but no additional hours of evening care given by those with a young school-age child Cited by: 6.

Connelly, Rachel & Kimmel, Jean, "The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children," IZA Discussion PapersInstitute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp   This paper uses data from the American Time Use Survey to examine the effect of the timing of parents’ daily work schedules on their caregiving time on weekdays. Since the timing of employment is a choice, the decision to work non-standard hours is modeled jointly with caregiving.

We find that high-wage non-standard mothers provide more caregiving than lower-wage non-standard. More specifically, although nonstandard work schedules leave more time during the day for mothers to interact with their young children, women who work late hours may be physically and emotionally exhausted during daytime hours and less able to fully engage in high-quality interactions (i.e., sensitive, stimulating, and responsive) with their young children, thereby creating negative implications for children's developmental outcomes.

This paper examined associations between mothers' work schedules and children's cognitive outcomes in the first 3 years of life for approximately children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care. Both the timing and duration of maternal nonstandard work schedules were examined.

These findings suggest that the homeschooling demands of these younger, primary school‐aged children have contributed to mothers’ reduced work hours. Mothers of children aged 1–5 also scaled back their work hours by hours, suggesting that the caregiving demands of young children also subtract from mothers’ work time.

For all working mothers with young children working in food services, annual tuition for two children in center-based child care is equal to more than. The role non-standard work status in parental caregiving for young children.

Nonstandard maternal work schedules during infancy: Implications for children’s early behavior problems. Infant Behavior and Development, 32, – PubMed. few consider the effects on young children.

On the one hand, working nonstandard schedules may represent a family-friendly work option for higher income, dual-earner families, especially if such occupations provide greater flexibility or more discretionary time during daytime hours to spend with their young children (Garey, ; Presser, ).

The role of nonstandard work hours in maternal caregiving for young children "This paper examines the effect of the timing of mothers' daily work schedules on the amount of maternal caregiving she engages in on that same day.

We look at total caregiving time. More specifically, although nonstandard work schedules leave more time during the day for mothers to interact with their young children, women who work late hours may be physically and emotionally exhausted during daytime hours and less able to fully engage in high-quality interactions (i.e., sensitive, stimulating, and responsive) with their young children, thereby creating negative implications for children.

The Impact of Nonstandard Work on Caregiving Jean Kimmel and Rachel Connelly The twentieth century was a period of dramatic transformation in the role that women play in society, highlighted most clearly by the rapid rise in paid employment of mothers with young children.

The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children. Article. to work nonstandard hours must be modeled jointly with its effect on caregiving time.

of increasing. The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children Rachel Connelly, Jean Kimmel published as 'The Role of Non-standard Work Status in Parental Caregiving for Young Children ' in Eastern Economic Journal,37 (2), IZA Discussion Paper No.

Many children live in households where either one or both parents work nonstandard schedules in the evening, night, or weekend. This study tests two competing hypotheses of whether nonstandard schedules result in lower levels of parent–child interaction or in more time with children.

Nonstandard Work Schedules, Child Care Subsidies, and Child Care Arrangements 7 require additional care hours to fill their needs during work hours. In the current study we examine whether nonstandard work is associated with more total child care hours, as well as considering its association with the type and number of arrangements used.

Many mothers work in jobs with nonstandard schedules (i.e., schedules that involve work outside of the traditional 9–5, Monday through Friday schedule); this is particularly true for economically disadvantaged mothers.

In the present article, we used longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey (n = 2, mothers of children ages 3–5 years) to examine the.

Caregiving obligations that interfere with parents’ ability to work can drive families with young children toward financial hardship; in fact, this is a contributing reason that half of young. This article uses the Australian Bureau of Statistics Time Use Survey to explore the relationship between parents’ non-standard work hours, and the time they and their spouse spend in paid work, housework, childcare (subdivided into routine tasks and talk-based interaction) and in their children.

MATERNAL EMPLOYMENT AND THE FAMILY ENVIRONMENT 89 families in the United States, found work during nonstandard hours and work by spouses during different shifts (strategies used by many families to juggle the needs of work and child rearing) had unfavorable implications for the well-being of the children.

The study of maternal time use is hugely important because of the relationship between quality caregiving and child well-being. Additionally, employers looking for new labor pools are also affected by the time use choices of mothers of young children because 60 percent of American mothers with young children are employed.

Introduction. Given the importance attributed to maternal care in cultural ideals 1 and psychological theories, 2 and the working role assumed by the majority of mothers with very young children, there has been widespread concern about effects of non-maternal child care for young children, and for infants in particular.

Subject. Rates of employment for the mothers of infants and preschoolers. The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children. Rachel Connelly, Jean Kimmel. published as 'The Role of Non-standard Work Status in Parental Caregiving for Young Children ' in Eastern Economic Journal,37 (2), As one consultee expressed it, when an exhausted mother of young children requests a reduction in her work hours, it may appear to the employer as a mere preference; in retrospect, when she has resigned, it will appear as a ‘compelling need’.

Consultees emphasized the importance of mutual cooperation and respect in family status accommodations. nonstandard work hours over this 1-year period.6 In an-other, Presser utilized longitudinal NSFH data for –87 and –94 to study the consequences of nonstandard work hours on families.7 However, the measures of shift work differed in the two interviews, precluding a study of changes in its practice over time.

First, according to Caregiving in the U.S.a report by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP, there are 40 million family caregivers who need support to do their crucial, complex jobs.

Second, these caregivers need more guidance to perform the same tasks that made us tremble the first time we performed them as new nurses.

“The Role of Nonstandard Work Hours in Maternal Caregiving for Young Children,” Eastern Economic Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Spring), pp. Connelly, Rachel and Jean Kimmel. “Spousal Influences on Parents’ Non-market Time Choices,” Review of the Economics of the HouseholdVol.

7, No. 4 (December), pp. Parenting or child rearing is the process of promoting and supporting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of a child from infancy to ing refers to the intricacies of raising a child and not exclusively for a biological relationship.

The most common caretaker in parenting is the father or mother, or both, biological parent(s) of the child in question. Parents are the primary providers of nurturing care for young children’s healthy early development.

However, the literature on parenting in early childhood, especially in low- and middle-income countries, has primarily focused on mothers. In this study, we investigate how parents make meaning of fathers’ parenting roles with regards to their young children’s early health and .Weekly work hours.

Among employees working at least 20 hours per week, men spend almost 50 hours per week on average in the workplace (Bond, Galinsky, & Swanberg, ).Previous research suggests that the stress associated with the increasing number of hours spend in paid employment may have negative repercussions for the quality of fathers’ relationships with their children (e.g., Crouter.